Healing approaches

Kinesiology: Learning the Touch for Health phenomenon

By Anita Ramsden, kinesiologist

Although Touch for Health has been described as the most widely-used system of kinesiology in the world, it is actually a relatively young alternative and complementary therapy. Since the first manual on the subject was published in 1973, millions of people in more than 100 countries have benefitted from it.

According to the International Kinesiology College: “The Touch for Health model does not treat or diagnose symptoms, but works with the energy, lifestyle and aspirations of the client, offering a safe and effective way to maintain health, enhance well-being and upgrade performance.”

In fact, the approach was created by the incredible John Thie, with the aim of encouraging and empowering people to take an active role in restoring and maintaining their own health and wellbeing and that their family and friends.

How can Touch for Health help me?

The premise of the so-called ‘Triangle of Health’ is that all aspects of an individual’s system need to be in balance for them to feel good. These aspects are mental/emotional, physical/structural and biochemical/physiological. When each of these elements are all in balance, you have an equilateral triangle. But if any one of them move out of balance, the triangle (and therefore, your health) become distorted.

For example, being under stress at work could affect your mental/emotional health, which in turn increases your stress hormone levels. This situation can generate biochemical problems, leading to headaches/migraines, an inability to sleep at night and so on. It could also result in muscular problems in the physical/structural area due to tight shoulder and/or back muscles, which creates poor posture, a twisted torso or even digestive issues.

In other words, an imbalance in one area can have a knock-on effect on each of the other areas too, so Touch for Health takes an holistic approach. But its aim is not to diagnose or treat symptoms. Instead it helps individuals and their bodies to move back into balance, thereby enabling them to attain health more readily.

How does Touch for Health help achieve balance?

Although it may sound a bit dry to say that Touch for Health is based on muscle monitoring or testing that helps obtain feedback from the body, it is actually a fun and fascinating thing to experience or feel. To help the body return to balance, muscle monitoring is used to literally communicate with it and find out exactly what it wants. 

A hands-on therapy, Touch for Health is based on Traditional Chinese Medicine, using the same principles as those employed in acupressure, work with the meridians and nutritional therapy. While this may sound daunting, the approach is actually taught in a very easy-to-understand way based on simple-to-use techniques.

Essentially, you build on your knowledge as you move through four different levels. While level one acts as an introduction, in level two, you learn to use muscle testing to discover which foods are beneficial to the body and which are not, alongside incredibly powerful emotional stress release procedures. By balancing the body in this way, it becomes possible to help relieve aches and pains and gain more clarity.

In fact, from the first balance onwards, you can start to see postural changes. Stress dissolves and faces light up. There is always lots of laughing and a great connection between the students, who are encouraged to take responsibility for themselves and their needs by speaking up for what they feel and want during a session.

Do I need any prior knowledge to learn Touch for Health?

Absolutely anyone can learn this amazing technique. For example, when I was taught it back in 2004, one member of our class was a lovely, vibrant 72-year old nun who wanted to help the other sisters in her convent feel better. She was awesome. I am also currently teaching my daughter who would like to take this skill to university with her. While it does take practice, the two-day practical hands-on workshops give you all of the information and experience you need to start balancing others. 

How long does it take to learn?

Touch for Health is taught in four levels, each of which takes the form of a two-day workshop, or equivalent time (15 hours). Homework and practice is required after each level because muscle testing is an art that needs to be nurtured and practiced regularly if you are to become proficient. Working with as many people as possible makes it easier to feel different, possible responses, so the more you do it, the more confident you will feel.  

What can you do with Touch for Health?

Undertaking levels one to four enables you to work with friends and family, but if you choose to go on to the proficiency level, you can become qualified to practice on members of the general public. Just so you know, Touch for Health is both a stand-alone therapy and is also recognised as acting as a foundation for other branches of kinesiology – so if you would like to know more, please drop me a line.

Anita Ramsden

Anita Ramsden is a kinesiologist. She is emphatic about affecting positive change and her work encourages wellbeing for mind, body and soul. Anita is also a member of the Kinesiology Federation.

OTHER ARTICLES THAT MAY INTEREST YOU

Kinesiology: A personal journeyKinesiology: A personal journey

Kinesiology: The science of human movement

A healthy heart: What’s love got to do with it?

Inspiring lifestyles

Three ways to care for yourself following winter hibernation

By Anita Ramsden, kinesiologist

I love the springtime because of the possibilities and hopefulness it offers as nature never lets us down.

The countryside can look so bleak in winter, but in reality everything is simply resting, restoring itself and conserving its energy. So when the sun starts to shine and the days warm up, everything is ready to burst out with newness and freshness to exploit its full potential.

At the start of winter, I read a blog about how people go within and, like much of the natural world, adopt an attitude of hibernation. It prompted me to think differently about things: Could we be happier if we saw ourselves and our behaviour reflected in those seasonal flows?

Certainly, the cold, grey days have not bothered me as much as usual because I have appreciated lighting the fire and acknowledging that this is a time to slow up, rest and get ready – for spring and growth.

So as we begin to emerge from our hibernation, what do we need to do to care for ourselves effectively? Hydration, movement and a quiet mind are key and here is why:

1. Raise your energy levels by hydrating your mind and body

During the winter, most of us spend a lot of our time inside. But life indoors can be very dehydrating. There is central heating, hot fires and the electromagnetic fields of WiFi networks and mobile phones. Computers and other electrical equipment all produce heat when we use them, but all of these things take their toll on the levels of water content in our cells.

Indeed, according to the Hydration Foundation: “We are 99% water molecules and even a 2% reduction in hydration leads to measurable cognitive loss.” It is certainly a pity that more schools do not realise this fact as reduced hydration levels affect everything from the amount of energy an individual has, to their mood, their ability to concentrate, their hunger levels and their ability to feel joyful.

But the solution is easy: Simply drink more water, ideally eight glasses a day.  Build it up slowly, especially if you currently do not consume that much, or indeed any.

A really beneficial way to start your day is with a big glass (eight to 12 oz) of water, with a pinch of pink Himalayan or sea salt and/or a squeeze of lemon. If you make it the first thing you do, you will give your organs a really good soak and get the hydration message straight into your cells and brain. But do not be tempted to use table salt as it does not contain the same essential minerals as other forms. 

Plants and seeds can also hydrate us too. So add a tablespoon of ground chia seeds to your water and/or daily smoothie. Chia seeds form ‘gel water’, which is what we find inside plants – think of succulents, such as the Aloe vera.

Scientists have also recently discovered gel water inside our cells. This means they can absorb it instantly, giving us a great deal more energy and allowing the water to stay in our body for use rather than going straight through us. Find out more by viewing this TEDtalk by Dr Gerald Pollack.  

A daily smoothie, which includes hydrating green veg, fruit, added ground chia and other seeds and nuts, will likewise provide you with long-lasting hydration – as will eating juicy fruit like apples. But you might also benefit from reading a book called Quench, which was released in 2018. Jam-packed with vital information you may not have considered before, it also provides a five-day ‘Quench’ plan to ensure optimum hydration.

Photo by Godisable Jacob on Pexels.com

2.Get moving

Once you become adequately hydrated, movement is important to encourage even more hydration at the cellular level. Many of us spend large chunks of time crunched up over our computer at a desk. But sitting in this way compromises your organs, and sitting still for long time periods has been deemed as harmful as smoking cigarettes. Not only is it dehydrating, but as an article in The Guardian once put it: “When you’re sitting, you’re one step from being dead.”

So make sure you get up and move. If you are focusing on hydrating yourself, a positive side effect is that your bladder will remind you to move, which will in turn increase your oxygen supply and improve your blood and lymph flow.

Elsewhere, standing desks have been found to increase productivity and reduce the number of sick days taken – but even just doing head-to-chin and small spinal twists while sitting will help.

Also make tiny, little movements before you get out of bed. When you see cats and dogs stretching as they wake up, they are helping the cerebral spinal fluid flow around the head and down the back, which means they both energise and detox themselves at same time.

In order to prepare your body for spring though, go out to get lunch rather than eat at your desk and take advantage of the vitamin D that the sun will help you produce. Or walk the dog more often, get off the bus one stop early or park a bit further than usual from your destination. These may sound like simple things, but they can make a big difference to your health and wellbeing.  

Spending time outside also aids sleep as sunlight is required to set our circadian rhythms – and our gut microbiota respond to these natural cycles positively too. Even better, spend time outside with a friend who makes you laugh in order to boost your energy levels and release health-giving hormones. It really is about looking for the magic in everyday life.

3. Learn to quiet your mind

Finally, train yourself to quieten your mind using meditation, mindfulness techniques or simply a walk in the park where you focus on nature rather than on what is going on in your head. It is refreshing, relaxing and reboots your thinking.

Moreover, all it takes is a bit practice, and the benefits are huge. By stimulating your vagus nerve in this easy way, you are taken out of a fight or flight response, which physiologically reduces your stress response.

You can do it anywhere and only 10 minutes a day will help boost your mood, your energy levels and help destress you. A really helpful app here is Headspace. Complementary medicine advocate Deepak Chopra’s meditation programme is also great and he has a new one starting at the end of March, so why not give it a go?

Anita Ramsden

Anita Ramsden is a kinesiologist. She is emphatic about affecting positive change and her work encourages wellbeing for mind, body and soul. Anita is also a member of the Kinesiology Federation.

OTHER ARTICLES THAT MAY INTEREST YOU

Gut health: Twelve ways to nurture a healthy microbiome

Water: The essence of life

Six common meditation myths busted

Healing approaches

A healthy heart: What’s love got to do with it?

heart-love-romance-6371.jpg

By Anita Ramsden, kinesiologist

The heart represents many things. More than just an organ that pumps oxygenated blood around our bodies to keep us alive, it is also a universal symbol of love and governs our ability to give and receive this vital emotion.

As a result, the kind of language we use in relation to the heart tends to be quite profound. We say things are ‘heartfelt’ and advise others to ‘speak from the heart’ or ‘follow your heart’. The phrase ‘you can’t decide with your head, you need to trust your heart’ is also a common one and positions this important organ as a key link between mind and body.

In physiological terms alone, the heart is an incredible machine. The size of a fist, it weighs about 10oz (283 grams) and beats around 70 times a minute. In that time, it moves five to seven litres of blood around the body, or up to 7,600 litres a day. Without its constant activity, we would die immediately.

The heart also has its own electromagnetic field, which being the largest in the body, permeates every cell and sends signals to our brain. Electrocardiograms (ECG) have indicated that the power of this field is 60 times greater than that of brain waves and can be measured several feet away from the body. The heart and brain synchronise through these energetic impulses and scientists working in the relatively new discipline of neurocardiology believe they are the basis of heart-brain communication.

These scientists have also discovered that the heart is a sensory organ, which consists of 40,000 neurons that are commonly associated with the brain. In fact, according to the HeartMath Institute: “The heart acts as a sophisticated information encoding and processing centre that enables it to learn, remember and make independent functional decisions that do not involve the cerebral cortex” of the brain.

Such information may help to explain why cardiac surgeons counsel patients and family members about the surprising after-effects of some heart transplant surgery. The patient who receives a donated organ can take on the characteristics, memories, tastes and preferences of the donor.

heart-brainlink

Heart-brain link

Recipients may also recall their donor’s personal details and in some instances, recognise and even feel love for their family and friends. In the words of Dr Daniel Keown, a practitioner of both Eastern and Western medicine and author of ‘The Spark in the Machine’, this scenario would appear to indicate that the heart has carried the donor’s memories within itself and shared them with its new recipient’s brain.

But there is also other evidence of a heart-brain link. For example, more heart attacks take place at 9am on a Monday morning than at any other time of the week, possibly due to an association with stressful situations such as work.

Stress-induced or Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, otherwise known as broken heart syndrome, likewise occurs when part of the heart is temporarily no longer able to pump well. This condition is commonly seen in patients following the death of a loved one. Metaphorically and physically, they are heart-broken.

But the heart is just as responsive to love and compassion. According to Deepak Chopra in his book ‘Training the Mind, Healing the Body’, the survival rate of patients who have had a heart attack is 80% higher if they believe their partner loves them. Research also shows that people who are in loving, kind and affectionate relationships experience less hardening of the arteries.

If someone is caught up in negative emotions such as anger, frustration or anxiety, on the other hand, their heart rhythms become more erratic and disordered as the endocrine system responds to the situation and their body goes into fight or flight mode.

Experiencing positive emotions such as appreciation, love or compassion produces the opposite effect though, creating highly ordered or coherent patterns that move the body into a state of peace. The heartbeat becomes even and synchronises with other bodily functions, such as blood pressure, digestion and breathing, which calms everything down.

boy gives flowers

Being kind

Another consideration in this context are the health benefits of being kind. The feelings generated from performing acts of kindness and compassion, or even of simply witnessing them, creates oxytocin – the ‘happiness hormone’ – in our body. Oxytocin, in turn, produces nitric oxide, which softens the walls of our arteries, improves blood flow and reduces blood pressure.

So it makes sense, both for ourselves and others, to choose a day each week to undertake kind acts. As Dr David Hamilton indicates in his books ‘Molecules of Kindness‘ and ‘Born to be Kind’: “We are genetically wired for kindness. The kindness gene, in fact, is 500 million years old – it’s one of our most ancient genes – which is WHY kindness impacts our biochemistry. It’s our deepest nature.”

Hugging someone, including your pet, is also another great way to produce oxytocin. Doing so will lead to a drop in your heart rate, reduce your stress hormones, cut your production of free radicals and lessen inflammation.

A lovely correction technique that I also use from the Creative Kinesiology school of practice is called ‘Heart Appreciation’. You can try it yourself by simply concentrating your mind on someone or something that you really appreciate and feeling how good it feels to do so.

Then breathe the feeling into your heart and let it spread throughout your entire body. Imagine your heart as a cup and watch it overflow. Your whole body will relax and your energy levels will rise significantly. Because it really is about feeling the love at every level – in body, mind and most particularly in the heart.

Anita Ramsden

Anita Ramsden is a kinesiologist. She is emphatic about affecting positive change and her work encourages wellbeing for mind, body and soul. Anita is also a member of the Kinesiology Federation.

OTHER ARTICLES THAT MAY INTEREST YOU

Gut health: Twelve ways to nurture a healthy microbiome

Homeopathy: The power of self-healing

The hidden scourge of nutritional deficiency

Healing approaches

Everything is energy, and energy is everything…

Rainbow Flower of Life
Rainbow Flower of Life

By Anita Ramsden, kinesiologist.

The energy field around each and every one of us is an amazing and complex thing. We can feel it, sense it – and some people can even see it.

Have you ever felt that you ‘just really like’ someone after meeting them for the first time? Or perhaps you have said to a friend:  “That guy gives me the creeps.” They have neither explicitly said nor done anything to give you this impression, but you just feel it.

We do not have to learn to sense what in quantum mechanics is called our energy field though – we just do it innately. In the words of biologist Bruce Lipton: “Our energy is a communication, and we broadcast who we are out into the field.”

In fact, we are all broadcasting and receiving all the time, and it is our feelings that let us know whether we are a good match for someone else’s energy. We may rationalise the process in our heads, but ultimately it is our feelings that should be trusted. If you really want to know the answer to something, ask your heart the question. Just be still and listen to hear what it has to say.

But most of us are so accustomed to this energy that we often fail to realise we are even reading it. For example, if you walk into a room where people have been arguing, while they may put on a ‘there-is-nothing-going-on-here’ facade, the energy in the room will likely feel a bit awkward. Can you relate to this idea?

Quantum physics, for one, has no trouble in describing the body’s energy field, and Lipton explains the matter very simply. He says that atoms are made out of energy. Atoms band together to form molecules and molecules come together to make cells, which means that cells are made out of energy.

But if you take this thought process through to its logical conclusion, it becomes clear that, as humans are made up of cells, what we actually are, is energy beings.

No wonder then that our feelings are intrinsically important to our health and wellbeing. The more energy you have, the better you will feel and, by the same token, the less energy you have, the worse you will feel. To put another slant on it, some people you spend time with may drag you down or drain you of energy, while others will make you feel uplifted, light-hearted and refreshed.

The energy around our body is referred to as our ‘aura’ and consists of our electromagnetic field or energy body. Some special people such as healer Donna Eden can see people’s energy bodies. She can see their vibrancy as well as the various patterns, colours and holes they contain. In fact, in her classic book ‘Energy Medicine’, she indicates that she recognises people by their energy.

AuricBodies

The auric field consists of seven layers of electromagnetic energy. It is our life force and it protects us. It filters, transmits and attracts energy. When we are happy, it is big, bold and strong. But stress in particular can bring it crashing inwards and its ability to protect us becomes more limited. As a result, we are left vulnerable to the energies, or moods, of others. We feel more fragile and less able to simply brush things off.

This means that the more you pay attention to your feelings and gravitate towards people and situations that uplift you, the healthier your aura will become. It will also attract more of the same energy to it, which means you will find yourself surrounded by more positive people. But the same is true in reverse though, of course.

As a kinesiologist, I work with the body’s energy. As much as I would love to, I am not able to see it, but I do feel it. People’s energy to me feels bright, vibrant, crystal clear or sludgy, stuck, murky or heavy. It can also feel wired, jagged, sad or a host of other emotions. I can likewise feel shape, colour and brightness. I sometimes see images or feel physical pain in my own body.

This situation can be hard for others to grasp. On first starting out, one of my now regular clients said: “Well, I will come and see you again for some of your witchery. I don’t understand it, but it does seem to have a positive effect on me.”

I can appreciate people’s uncertainty in a modern age in which most of us rely so much more on science than on intuition. But as Eden says: “With our body comes an intelligence that exceeds understanding and intellect.”

Strangely though, there are a number of unseen energy forces that we choose to accept without question, perhaps because science has legitimised them or we have simply never thought about them in any depth. For instance, what stops us from flying off the planet? Isn’t there just as much “witchery” in gravity as there is in the body having its own energy system?

So many everyday magical things surround us in nature and all of them either require energy to exist or exist because of energy. Think of a seedling bursting out of its casing in the spring and pushing up through the soil. Or the heat from the sun’s energy that warms our planet, which for the most part is unseen – just felt.

Because, in fact, the energetic systems that protect, maintain and sustain our bodies were first documented in a work on Chinese medicine in around 100BC – ‘The Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine’ (Huangdi Neijing) referred to an “organised system of diagnosis and treatment” for acupuncture.

So such ideas are not really quite as ‘out there’ as some think. Rather they are simply concepts that have been forgotten in the West, but are now starting to re-emerge and move back into mainstream thought.

Anita Ramsden

Anita Ramsden is a kinesiologist. She is emphatic about affecting positive change and her work encourages wellbeing for mind, body and soul. Anita is also a member of the Kinesiology Federation.

OTHER ARTICLES THAT MAY INTEREST YOU

Kinesiology: The science of human movement

Kinesiology: A personal journey

The transformational power of personal yoga practice

Healing approaches, Inspiring stories

Kinesiology: A personal journey

Life's journey
Life’s journey

By Anita Ramsden, kinesiologist.

Someone asked me the other day how I first got into kinesiology and that made me think of how my journey into the profession started a long time ago.

In fact, I was a student in London doing a BA honours degree in Jewellery at the time. Our technician had asked for some willing guinea pigs for his wife, who was studying to become a kinesiologist. Everyone looked at him with blank faces – and even now, I still occasionally get ‘a kinesi-what?’

But it did not take too much persuasion to get involved, mainly due to the fact that she was happy to feed any willing bodies, albeit macrobiotic food, which as it happens was delicious. So a pioneering group of us set off to discover what this brave new world was all about.

We lay down on the couch and ‘resisted her pressure’ as she tested the muscles of our arms and legs in various positions. She carried out corrections using massage points, homeopathic drops, colour, sound and so on. It was fascinating and magical. The whole experience was lots of fun and a huge eye opener to things I had never previously known existed.

But it was a year or so later that my journey down this path really began as I developed psoriasis, mainly on my scalp, while undertaking my finals. I saw a doctor many times during this time and tried all manner of shampoos, steroid creams and tablets, but to no avail.

Eventually I gave a kinesiologist a go and, after my first session, he advised me that my body was struggling to absorb dairy products and that I should stop eating anything containing milk. This statement caused me to experience a whole range of emotions, the biggest of which was fear.

No more cappuccinos – was he crazy? OMG, what about cake? Cheese I did not mind so much as I had always considered it a pointless food that I neither liked nor understood – and as for milk, yuk.

But this was back in the early 1990’s and dairy-free foods were not as readily available then, although they could be found in health food shops. You certainly would not come across them in what a friend calls “the fusspot section” of the supermarket as we do now.

Leap of faith
Leap of faith

Leap of faith

So I took a leap of faith, irritating anyone who offered to cook for me in the process, by swapping out cows milk-based products for the only real alternative at the time, soya milk. And I was disappointed to report there was no real change.

But when I returned to the kinesiologist, we discovered that my body had just as much of an aversion to soy as it did to dairy. No soya. Holy Moly – what would I eat now?

So I duly cut out all the soya products, which was not much of a sacrifice as I did not care much for them anyway. And then the magic happened: my psoriasis got better, disappearing never, ever, to return again.

I felt great. My digestive system was no longer a grumpy, irritated beast that made me prone to bloating, cramping and feeling gaseous, with all of the unfortunate consequences that entails.

I also no longer suffered from regular, painful coldsores, brought on by late nights, too much work and any kind of fun or stress. One of them even went rogue at one point and turned into impetigo. But I have to report that over the last 20 years or so, I have only had three or four at most.

While all of this may not sound life-changing, it was to me. I realised that my system was not depleted as a result of taking drugs or medicines. It was simply about putting something into my body that it struggled to digest. After years of doing its best, the added stress of my finals was just more than it could take.

When I look back, my body was always trying to tell me that I was failing to make lactase, the enzyme required to break down lactose in milk. Or alternatively, perhaps I did not have enough of it, or something was blocking it.

But as a baby, once my mum tried to put me on formula milk, I became covered in eczema. We struggled on though, eventually settling on a goat’s milk formula that was not rejected immediately by my delicate system.

Life force
Life force

Times move on

Although we were given various creams to help, I also developed multiple ear infections and repeated tonsillitis. By the age of five, they took out my tonsils and adenoids, which was a horrid operation. Could the procedure have been avoided if milk had not impaired my immune system? Yes, I believe so.

But times have moved on since then and at least some GPs would now suggest reducing or removing dairy from your diet in the case of skin complaints.

Anyway, this history meant that the kinesiologist’s diagnosis really struck a chord with me. I needed to add nothing to my diet – just take something away. It was so simple and yet it enhanced everything – my energy, my overall health and, much to my boyfriend’s delight, also reduced my moodswings. My digestive system became calm and amenable.

After that, I started seeing a kinesiologist for all of my ailments. By the time I came to seriously consider if I could actually work this magic myself, I had been benefiting from it for a very long time. I took all three of my children to my kinesiologist and most of my friends went too – if only to shut me up.

The most dramatic situation though was when I broke my coccyx. It became dislodged and moved over to one side rather than being straight. I had also slipped a disc and was suffering from sciatica, which meant I found it difficult to walk or drive. After my scan, the consultant said the best thing would be to have the coccyx surgically removed.

But I decided to call my kinesiologist, who is also a craniosacral therapist. Using very gentle techniques, she was able to encourage my body to ease the coccyx back into alignment. I suffered no more pain or discomfort and had no more need for it to be chopped off.

What more can I say: I love this work and am very keen for others to have healthy, happy outcomes as a result of it too – which is why I became a kinesiologist in the first place.

I have now also qualified as a ‘Touch for Health’ kinesiology instructor. If you would like to see for yourself whether this approach works for you, Touch for Health is the first step, so please contact me directly for teaching dates. Alternatively, if you would like to find out more about kinesiology in general or locate a practitioner near you, the Kinesiology Federation is definitely the place to go.

selfp

Anita Ramsden is a kinesiologist. She is emphatic about affecting positive change and her work encourages wellbeing for mind, body and soul. Anita is also a member of the Kinesiology Federation.

OTHER ARTICLES THAT MAY INTEREST YOU

Kinesiology: The science of human movement

Picking up clues on the journey to self-discovery

Homeopathy: Awakening the vital force